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The experiments use cubic hermite interpolation to sample fractionally, and they use crossfading to fight popping between grains. Everything uses a grain size of 20 milliseconds, and a cross fade of 2 milliseconds.

To start out, we can play the sound faster and slower to naively adjust pitch and length.

Here’s a fast / high pitched version (70% of time):

Here’s an even faster / higher pitched version (40% of time):

Here’s a slow / low pitched version (130% of time):

And here’s an even slower / lower pitched version (210% of time):

Here is a sound made shorter (70% of time) using granular synthesis, so is the same length as the fast/high version, but has the same pitch as the original. Pretty cool, right?

Here is the sound made even shorter (40% of time) so is the same length as the faster/higher version, but has the same pitch as the original again.

Here is the sound made longer (130% of time), but again has the same length as the original.

And here is the even longer version (210% of time).

If we want to adjust the pitch but leave the length alone, there are two ways you could do that.

The first way is to use granular synthesis to change the length of the sound (longer or shorter), keeping the pitch the same, then use the regular “naive” method to make that resulting sound be the original sound length again.

If you made the sound shorter to start with, this process would decrease the pitch. If you made the sound longer to start with, this process would increase the pitch.

Here is a sound where that process is used to make the pitch about 1.43 times higher (1.0/0.7), but keeps the same sound length.

Another way to get a very similar result is to just change the playback rate of the grains themselves – INDEPENDENTLY of how many times you repeat the grains (0 to N times) which changes sound length.

Ignore the Shortfalls
by Hanna Watkin 3 weeks ago
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In an effort to show how useful 3D printing can be when you only take the benefits of the technology and work around the negatives, researchers from Sandia National Laboratories have developed a 3D printed telescope in a third of the time and at a fifth of the traditional cost.

A team of researchers from Sandia National Laboratories decided to use 3D printing to build a telescope and demonstrate that it’s possible to take the strengths of the technology and embrace the weaknesses.

The idea behind the three-yearLaboratory Directed Research and Development project was to approach additive manufacturing as though it were a brand new design tool. During this time, they moved awayfrom the regular process of going from hand drawing to computer-assisted design to machining parts.

Rather than concentrating on printing precision parts, the researchers’ idea was to fabricate imprecise parts, quickly, which could then be assembled and perfected using precise tools.

The result was a ground-based telescope which was designed, rapidly prototyped and manufactured in about a third of the time of that required for a traditionally made telescope. It also cost just a fifth of the price and was lighter in weight too.

For this project, 3D printing, module design and image-correction algorithms all helped to save time and money. Ted Winrow, a mechanical engineer who led the project explains: “That’s the nuance that seems to get lost, that you have to design differently. It doesn’t plug into a standard design process.”

Using 3D Printing as a New Design Tool

The researchers explain that it’s possible to make a precision structure in two ways. Either you make every piece to exact tolerances or you make rough pieces and use precise assembly to compensate for any imprecise dimensions.

With the method used by the researchers, Winrow explains that you can shift money from recurring costs, “ where every part has to be precise, to nonrecurring costs, where you’re just buying one set of tools that you can use for maybe 10 years… So when you’re making production runs you get cost savings. You’ve got time savings because you’re not waiting for each piece to be made.”

As we already know, 3D printing can produce lightweight complex parts that regular machining processes struggle with. However, the machining process can create a very precise part. Winrow explains that the real issue is whether we can design a system which is “ insensitive to the things that additive is not very good at ” so you can take advantage of the good things.

Interestingly, the team also approached the lens of the telescope in a similar manner – taking advantage of benefits while designing ways around shortfalls by developing software to maintain image properties.

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